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24
JAN
2014

Food safety information.

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Clean: Wash hands and surfaces often According to food safety experts, bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get on to cutting boards, knives, sponges and counter tops. Here’s how to Fight BAC: Wash hands in hot soapy water before preparing food and after using the bathroom, changing diapers and handling pets. For best results, consumers should use warm water to moisten their hands and then apply soap and rub their hands together for 20 seconds before rinsing thoroughly. Wash cutting boards, knives, utensils and counter tops in hot soapy water after preparing each food item and before going on to the next one. Use plastic or other non-porous cutting boards. Cutting boards should be run through the dishwasher – or washed in hot soapy water – after use. Consider using paper towels to clean up kitchen surfaces. Or, if using cloth towels, consumers should wash them often in the hot cycle of the washing machine. Separate: Don’t cross-contaminate Cross-contamination is how bacteria spreads from one food product to another. This is especially true for raw meat, poultry and seafood. Experts caution to keep these foods and their juices away from ready-to-eat foods. Here’s how consumers can Fight BAC: Separate raw meat, poultry and seafood from other food in the grocery shopping cart. Store raw meat, poultry and seafood on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator so juices dont drip onto other foods. If possible, use one cutting board for raw meat products and another for salads and other foods which are ready to be eaten. Always wash cutting boards, knives and other utensils with hot soapy water after they come in contact with raw meat, poultry and seafood. Never place cooked food on a plate which previously held raw meat, poultry or seafood. Cook: Cook to proper temperatures Food safety experts agree that foods are properly cooked when they are heated for a long enough time and at a high enough temperature to kill the harmful bacteria that cause foodborne illness. The best way to Fight BAC is to: Use a meat thermometer, which measures the internal temperature of cooked meat and poultry, to make sure that the meat is cooked all the way through. Cook roasts and steaks to at least 145F. Whole poultry should be cooked to 180F for doneness. Cook ground meat, where bacteria can spread during grinding, to at least 160F. Information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) links eating undercooked, pink ground beef with a higher risk of illness. If a thermometer is not available, do not eat ground beef that is still pink inside. Cook eggs until the yolk and white are firm, not runny. Don’t use recipes in which eggs remain raw or only partially cooked. Cook fish until it is opaque and flakes easily with a fork. Make sure there are no cold spots in food (where bacteria can survive) when cooking in a microwave oven. For best results, cover food, stir and rotate for even cooking. If there is no turntable, rotate the dish by hand once or twice during cooking. Bring sauces, soups and gravy to a boil when reheating. Heat other leftovers thoroughly to 165F. Chill: Refrigerate promptly Food safety experts advise consumers to refrigerate foods quickly because cold temperatures keep most harmful bacteria from growing and multiplying. So, public health officials recommend setting the refrigerator at 40 F and the freezer unit at 0 F and occasionally checking these temperatures with an appliance thermometer. Then, Americans can Fight BAC by following these steps: Refrigerate or freeze perishables, prepared food and leftovers within two hours. Never defrost (or marinate) food on the kitchen counter. Use the refrigerator, cold running water or the microwave. Divide large amounts of leftovers into small, shallow containers for quick cooling in the refrigerator. With poultry and other stuffed meats, remove the stuffing and refrigerate it in a separate container. Don’t pack the refrigerator. Cool air must circulate to keep food safe. Foodborne Illnesses According to public health and food safety experts, each year millions of illnesses in this country can be traced to foodborne bacteria. While the likelihood of serious complications is unknown, the Food and Drug Administration estimates that two to three percent of all foodborne illnesses lead to secondary long-term illnesses. For example, certain strains of E.coli can cause kidney failure in young children and infants; Salmonella can lead to reactive arthritis and serious infections; Listeria can cause meningitis and stillbirths; and Campylobacter may be the most common precipitating factor for Guillain-Barre syndrome. Food Safety for… Meat, Poultry, and Seafood Lovers! We all know that meat, poultry, and seafood provide great sources of protein and other essential vitamins, but mishandling them may not be so healthful. Remember that all perishable foods, like meat, poultry, eggs, and seafood, need to be handled properly to prevent foodborne illness. Cook It Right Cook ground meat to at least 160 F. Ground poultry should be cooked to 165 F. Cook roasts and steaks to an internal temperature of at least 145 F for medium rare or to 160 F for medium. Whole poultry should be cooked to 180 F — measure the temperature in the thigh. Poultry breasts should be cooked to 170 F. Cook fish until it’s opaque and flakes easily with a fork. TIPS -Don’t forget to wash your hands with soap and warm water before and after preparing raw meat, poultry, and seafood. -Use a clean food thermometer to make sure raw meat and poultry have been cooked to a safe internal temperature. Wash the food thermometer in hot, soapy water between uses. Combating Cross-Contamination! S-e-p-a-r-a-t-i-n-g is Essential! To prevent raw juices from contaminating ready-to-eat foods, separate raw meat, poultry, and seafood from other foods in your grocery store shopping cart and in your refrigerator. Take 2 Consider using one cutting board for raw meat, poultry, and seafood products and another one for fresh fruits and vegetables. In addition, don’t forget to wash your hands with soap and warm water and your cutting boards, dishes, and utensils with hot, soapy water after they come in contact with raw meat, poultry, and seafood. Clean Your Plate Place cooked food on a clean platter. If you put cooked food on an unwashed platter that previously held raw meat, poultry, or seafood, bacteria from the raw food could contaminate the safely cooked food. Seal It Up To prevent juices from raw meat, poultry, or seafood from dripping onto other foods in your refrigerator, place these raw foods in sealed containers, plastic bags, or on a plate or tray. Then store them on the bottom shelf, so they don’t drip onto foods below them. Marinating Mandate Don’t use sauce that was used to marinate raw meat, poultry, or seafood on cooked foods, unless you boil it before applying. Never taste marinade or sauce that was used to marinate raw meat, poultry, or seafood unless it was heated to the boiling point first. FAQs Q: Should I wash raw meat, poultry or seafood before cooking it? A: Washing raw poultry, beef, pork, lamb, veal, or seafood before cooking is not necessary. Although washing these raw foods may get rid of some of the pathogens on the surface of these foods, it may allow the pathogens to spread around the kitchen. Cooking these foods to a safe internal temperature will destroy any bacteria that may be present in the food. Use a clean food thermometer to make sure food has reached the proper temperature. Q: If cooked meat and poultry look pink, does it mean that the food is not done? A: The color of cooked meat and poultry is not a sure sign of its degree of doneness. For instance, hamburgers and fresh pork can remain pink even after cooking to temperatures of 160 F or higher. Smoked poultry remains pink, no matter how cooked it is. Only by using a food thermometer can you accurately determine that meat and poultry have reached safe internal temperatures. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention does not recommend eating undercooked or raw meat, poultry, and seafood as these can be associated with a higher risk of foodborne illness. Q: Is it safe to eat sushi, the Japanese raw fish specialty? A: People in the at-risk groups (young children, pregnant women, senior citizens, and people with weakened immune systems) should not eat raw or undercooked fish or shellfish. People with liver disorders or weakened immune systems are especially at risk for getting sick. Foods made with raw fish are more likely to contain parasites or Vibrio species than foods made from cooked fish. Always cook fish until it’s opaque and flakes easily with a fork. Safe-Cooking Temperature Chart Beef/Pork Cook beef roasts and steaks to 145 F for medium rare or to 160 F for medium. Cook ground beef to at least 160 F. Cook raw sausages to 160 F. Reheat ready-to-eat sausages to 165 F. Cook pork roasts, chops, or ground patties to 160 F for medium, or 170 F for well done. Poultry Cook whole poultry to 180 F. Cook ground poultry to 165 F. Cook chicken breasts to 170 F. Cook stuffing to 165 F. Eggs Cook eggs until the yolks and whites are firm. Don’t use recipes in which eggs remain raw or only partially cooked. Fish Cook fish until it’s opaque and flakes easily with a fork. Avoid eating raw oysters or raw shellfish. People with liver disorders or weakened immune systems are especially at risk for getting sick. Leftovers When reheating leftovers, heat them thoroughly to at least 165 F. Partnership for Food Safety Education 611 Pennsylvania Ave., SE, Suite 140 Washington, DC 20003 JMH Education Marketing, Inc., New York, NY